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Thread: Cedar siding help

  1. #1
    Squirt
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    14

    Cedar siding help

    Hey all, looking for a little guidance on a job I'm going to do. Cedar shake siding on second story with either painted asbestos siding or brick on the first story. My initial thought is DS'ing 30/70 (SH/H2O) house wash, with some cling in it. But after reading and watching several videos, I'm leaning toward getting a FatBoy and giving that a shot. My question(s) is, would the DS work just as well, and if I go with the FatBoy set up, am I using the same chem ratio?

    If I'm completely off base with this, please let me know. Thanks for the help.

    I've attached a picture to give you a better look.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Brian Parker
    Virginia Beach Exterior Services
    www.vbexteriorservices.com
    757-348-3073

  2. #2
    Most profitable thing would be to walk away. It needs a deck stipper, not bleach. Run off onto the paint and brick below is going to be a night mare.
    William
    Chuck Norris can believe it's not butter.

  3. #3
    Squirt
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    14
    Let's assume that since I took the time to ask the forum, the "walk away" option isn't on the table.

  4. #4
    If you can't accept advice shouldn't ask. Set up scaffolding, tape up windows in plastic. wrap copper roof in plastic. Xjet potash on shakes. Wash with low pressure sideways from top down. Rinse, rinse, rinse. downstream vinegar on shakes. Rinse. Repaint upper facia. repaint trim and maybe brick from stipper run off. Constantly ask "what was I thinking when there is so much easy work our there. Maybe that William was o to something after all".
    William
    Chuck Norris can believe it's not butter.

  5. #5
    Brian,

    Disregard the previous advice. The last thing those cedar shakes need is a wood stripper. There is no wood stain on those shakes. I'm at the moment "retired", but will be back in action next year. I've been doing just exterior wood restoration for 13 years.

    What you see on those shakes is mostly old and dead, built up mold/mildew stains. A fairly easy clean, aside from the height. Don't have a clue to down streaming, we only use Shurflo and Pump Tec pumps to apply chemicals. We mix our chems fresh in 5 gal. buckets on site. What hits the wood is straight mix.

    What you want on those cedar shakes is no more than 1.5 - 2.0% sodium hypochlorite (bleach). This will kill any existing alive mold/mildew fast. Wood is a lot different than roofs, vinyl siding, concrete. Too much SH on wood will turn those shakes into a furry mess. Add in a little bit of soap to lift dirt, non-ammonia Dawn dish detergent is fine if you can get it. Otherwise, make sure that you dilute the SH with water before adding the soap. Three "squirts" per gallon of mix is enough. If you have a surfactant on hand, no more than 2 oz. per gallon is good, as it keeps the chem on the shakes wet longer. In any event, do a section at a time, keeping the wood wet with water from just a mist from your pressure washer. 15 or 20 minutes should be enough before washing. Keeping the chem mix wet softens up the old built up crud, to make rinsing with low pressure doable.

    And yes, low pressure. Just enough to clean. Cedar is a very soft wood and easily damaged. Go "with the grain" of the shakes, up and down. You may be tempted to pressure wash the bottom and side edges of the shakes. Don't. This just forces water to whatever is underneath the shakes. Not a good idea. The SH mix itself will do its job, you will see that when dry.

    I would stipulate a disclaimer in your contract on water intrusion around windows. Rare, but can happen through no fault of your work.
    - Rick Petry
    Windsor WoodCare
    Ringoes, NJ
    (609) 468-7965 cell
    www.windsorwoodcare.com
    rick@windsorwoodcare.com

  6. #6
    Please every thing here with a grain of salt. Bleach does not belong on cedar. Use the correct chems that were made for what your cleaning. Rick is a great guy but I have to differ on the bleach. Use correct chems for each job. Even better, leave anything that is a headache and focus on the easy work.
    William
    Chuck Norris can believe it's not butter.

  7. #7
    Squirt
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    14
    Rick and William,

    Guys, thanks for the advice. I know it's easy to just say no and walk away, but I am trying to build a business that does quality work on more than just vinyl and brick. This is a big job, that will hopefully lead to a new revenue stream. Most importantly I want to do a great job for my client. I'll keep you posted on the progress.

    Brian
    Brian Parker
    Virginia Beach Exterior Services
    www.vbexteriorservices.com
    757-348-3073

  8. #8
    Good Luck. Please listen to Rick over me. I tend to be grumpy and curmudgeonly at times Make your goal to be successful enough where you can turn down anything that isn't easy.
    William
    Chuck Norris can believe it's not butter.

  9. #9
    Squirt
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    14
    The final result. The middle picture is while it was still wet, and the bottom is a day later.

    I ended up using CedarWash. Fairly simple application, only pain was being on a ladder. Thanks all for the replies. Just got asked to quote the sealing job as well.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Brian Parker
    Virginia Beach Exterior Services
    www.vbexteriorservices.com
    757-348-3073

  10. #10
    Very nice work Brian! Specializing in work of this magnitude will give you an edge above most others. Everyone wants the easy stuff however, The guys whom take on these kinds of projects will be respected greatly. Sort of like "Norm" from "This old house". A dying breed....

    Also, specializing in this kind of work will command higher profits as people will quickly learn of your experience and attention to detail which most others will grossly fall short on.

    If you're not really into the sealing aspect, find a good painter in your area who will come behind you and do the sealing part! I have a good painter whom I fully trust his work and it's how I go about most of these projects. We have two Gals in our area who specialize in stripping wall paper and prep the walls for paint. It's all they do and they do a damn good job with it. They have more work than imaginable.

    Again, Excellent job with those shakes!!!!

    Mike
    Michael Heward
    Coastal Cleaning Service
    Serving Central and Southern Anne Arundel County
    Millersville,MD.
    www.coastalcleaningmd.com

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