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  1. #1
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    Ladders and Pressure Washers

    Author Unknown....

    Pressure Washers and Ladders


    When using pressure washers, no matter what type ladders you are using it pays to be extra careful. Falls from even low heights can create seriously painful or disabling injuries. Credible estimates by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission state that these accidents create 65,000 visits annually to hospital emergency rooms.
    When choosing your ladder, consider the use, the load and the general condition of the ladder.
    Ladders are rated for total weight they can carry; this includes the operator plus any materials he/she may be carrying. These are duty rated. Type III ladders are designed for homeowner use with a maximum load of 200lbs. for more than this choose a medium duty type II , these are rated for loads of 225lbs. If you have employees you have the responsibility of employee safety, in this case, always choose a type I heavy duty 250lb.+ rated ladder.
    Never stand on top or even on the top rung of a stepladder. When on a straight or extension ladder do not use the top three rungs. Remember the usable length of a ladder is always less than its actual length. Consider also the fact that you will lose additional working height due to the angle with which it is setup. Take these points into consideration when deciding on length.
    When purchasing new check for potentially dangerous defects. On metal ladders check for dents, bent or twisted rungs, steps or rails. Wooden ladders should not have large knots, chips or cracks. All should be free of loose rungs or steps. The bottom step on all stepladders should have metal angle braces. Check a stepladder by standing on the first step and twisting, if it feels unsteady, don't boy it, Find another. Those made of metal should have slip resistant feet of either rubber or plastic they should also have slip resistant steps this is a desirable feature for wooden too.
    You'll never see the power company use metal. Always use wooden or fiberglass construction when anywhere in the vicinity of power lines, don't take the chance, it's not worth it.
    You can have an accident with even the best constructed equipment. Remember to set up t properly and use good common sense when working from a ladder.


    Straight and Extension Ladders
    To raise a straight ladder brace the lower end against the wall and grasp the top rung with both hands. Raise the top rung and walk underneath the ladder, moving down the rungs until it is is vertical.
    When using an extension type, raise it to the desired height, being sure the locks engage properly on both sides.
    If you are getting onto a roof, there should be 3 feet (at least three rungs) extending beyond the edge of the roof. The ground at the base should be both level and firm. Large flat wooden boards placed under the feet can level it on uneven ground or give a better footing on soft ground.
    If possible, secure the ladder. One way to do this is to have someone hold the bottom.
    *Never use in a strong wind.
    *The point where it rests against the wall should be flat and firm.
    *These should never be placed in front of a door that is not locked, blocked or guarded.
    *Before positioning, check for insect or bird nests under the eaves; when at the top this is no place to discover a wasp nest.
    Face the ladder when climbing or descending and use both hands. Mount from the center, not from the side. Tools should be carried in the pockets, in a bag attached to a belt, or raised and lowered by rope. Be sure that the soles of your shoes are clean and dry. Work facing the ladder, holding on with one hand. If it is ever necessary to work with both hands, hook one leg over the rung. Don't lean too far to the side while working. A good general guide is to keep your body centered between the rails. Instead of leaning to the side, get down and move the ladder. In case of sudden dizziness or a panicky feeling, bow your head, drape both arms over the rung in front of you, close your eyes, and wait until the feeling passes. Do not use these as scaffolds or for any purpose except those intended. Be very careful when using a metal around electrical wires or equipment. Many fatalities occur when metal ladders brush against power lines while being moved. Use only double-insulated or properly grounded electrical tools. To be safer, use only a dry wooden or non-conductive fiberglass ladder when working around electrical wires or equipment.


    Stepladders
    Erect a stepladder only on a flat level surface. Do not place it on a table or any similar platform for added height.
    Never use a stepladder unopened.
    Before climbing a stepladder, make sure that its legs are fully extended and the spreader locked. The locking device on some may present a pinching hazard, so keep fingers clear when setting these up.
    Do not step on the top platform or top step.
    Do not step on the bucket shelf or attempt to climb or stand on the rear section supports. They are not designed to support the weight of a person.
    Finally, no matter what kind of ladder you are using, never leave a raised ladder unattended. It could fall unexpectedly and injure someone.
    Storage and Maintenance
    To keep a ladder in good condition, proper storage and maintenance is a necessity. All types should be stored in a sheltered area. Those exposed to heat combined with dampness need a dry, well-ventilated storage area. A wooden ladder used outdoors should be shellacked, varnished or given two coats of linseed oil as a protective coating. When new some may already have protective coatings; this will vary with the manufacturer. Never paint these; the paint can hide defects. Straight and extension types should be stored horizontally on racks or hooks with support points at the top, middle, and bottom to prevent sagging and warping. Always inspect before each use for wear and damage. This is particularly important after a long period of storage or after being dropped. Have repair work done only by a competent repair shop. If there is major damage don't hesitate, discard it. Do not attempt to straighten bent metal. Never use any type damaged. Periodically tighten the reinforcing rods under the steps of a stepladder, the spreader hinges and other hardware.
    Louisville, KY 859-539-9274
    We own and operate an awesome Cleaning Service in Lexington KY as well as provide
    great Pressure Washing service in Louisville KY.
    Facebook Pressure Washing Louisville

  2. #2

    Re: Ladders and Pressure Washers

    my 24' Gorilla folding ladder folded on me. right on my head while I was putting it up. Thought the pins were locked. man did that hurt. If i hadnt been close to the center, it could have cracked my skull.

    also had my extension ladder slip out from under me as I climed off a roof. Footed on concrete, and when I got both feet on it it went!
    I grabbed the roof, then the gutter as I fell and landed feet first right between the rungs. Damn lucky the edges of the gutter werent sharp, and i didnt break my leg.
    Jon Chapman
    Pro Pressure Clean and Seal
    727-432-2501
    www.propaverseal.com

  3. #3

    Re: Ladders and Pressure Washers

    Had a 24' extension ladder slip on concrete while I was cleaning out gutters. My elbow went in the gutter and the rung of the ladder pinned my arm there. I couldn't move up or down or fall or nothing. 80 year old lady watching from her lawn chair started screaming and came unglued. :-[ Luckily the neighbor was out washing his car and came over to help. Got the job of cleaning his gutters too.
    Curtis Martin, Owner
    Captain's Presssure Cleaning
    615-708-2731
    Liberty, TN 37095

  4. #4

    Re: Ladders and Pressure Washers

    You guys seriously need to get ladder stops.

    Thad Eckhoff
    Apex Services
    Hattiesburg, MS
    (601) 329-5819

  5. #5

    Re: Ladders and Pressure Washers

    Thad Eckhoff
    Apex Services
    Hattiesburg, MS
    (601) 329-5819

  6. #6
    Prestige Member
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    Celeste's World
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    Re: Ladders and Pressure Washers

    Those are reasons that we spent stupid amounts of money on our extension poles - we can't afford to get hurt on those death trap things! Feet on ground is a good thing

    Celeste
    Carolina ProWash - Boss
    Chicken Wrangler
    Glass Artist Extraordinaire

  7. #7

    Re: Ladders and Pressure Washers

    I come from the school of "Hard Knocks" otherwise known as Hard Knocks University. Every day I learn a better or safer way to do things. Sometimes it comes from these forums. Thanks to all of you.

    "That which does not kill you only makes you stronger"
    Curtis Martin, Owner
    Captain's Presssure Cleaning
    615-708-2731
    Liberty, TN 37095

  8. #8

    Re: Ladders and Pressure Washers

    Either our ladders have leg levelers or we use ladder pros. Either way as long as we are level. Ladder safety is one of the first items we cover for new employees and every Spring. We only use the highest rated aluminum for exterior work. Fiberglass would be better for shock possibilities. We use little Giant or Werner. You can never be too safe. Thank You.
    Terry Miller
    Canton, Ohio
    330-418-8955
    Quality-Service-Price
    Your Service Company for Life!

  9. #9

    Re: Ladders and Pressure Washers

    I haven't actually started my business yet. Still trying to figure this thing out but I stopped in Cleveland to meet Bob (Great Guy), talked at length with Tim Aselton (Another great guy. Thanks, Tim) and I have been reading posts here. Thanks to all for your contributions. Thought I could contribute this for what it might be worth. I have looked at the Little Giant with interest but I saw these at a contractor home show recently. They seem much more heavy duty than a Little Giant, if this is a type of ladder you would want.

    http://www.jawsladders.com/index.html

  10. #10
    Prestige Member
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    Re: Ladders and Pressure Washers

    Very good information. Thanks for posting it. I hate getting on ladders, but I do it often. Before I step on one, I always double and triple check things. Never do I put it up then start climbing. It doesn't take much to stop and look at what you are about to do.
    Jackson MS

    Extreme Video Training
    www.extremevideotraining.com
    [url=http://www.extremevideotraining.com]Video Services in Jackson MS[/url

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