Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: OSHA standards for sodium hypochloite

  1. #1

    OSHA standards for sodium hypochloite

    Hazards
    Since most bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals.

    Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar, drain cleaners containing sodium bisulfate (sodium hydrogen sulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water; the position of the equilibrium is pH dependent and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1]

    Cl2 + H2O H+ + Cl- + HClO

    Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odor, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths.
    Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average—40 hour week) by OSHA in the U.S.[2]


    A recent study [5]indicated for the first time that sodium hypochlorite and organic chemicals (e.g., surfactants, fragrances) contained in several household cleaning products react to generate chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These chlorinated compounds are emitted during cleaning applications and most of them are toxic and probable human carcinogens.



    Preliminary risk assessment suggested that using these cleaning products may significantly increase the cancer risk [6]. Further studies are also needed for a detailed investigation of the health risks associated with the use of these products and other possible exposure routes (i.e., dermal). However, these are not the only adverse environmental effects of the released VOCs, they are also ozone depleting compounds and powerful greenhouse gases.



    1. ^ a b Cotton, F.A; G. Wilkinson (1972). Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. John Wiley and Sons Inc. ISBN 0-471-17560-9.
    2. ^ Occupational Safety & Health Administration (2007). "and peroxide/recognition.html OSHA -- Chlorine". OSHA. Retrieved on 2007-08-26.
    5. ^ Odabasi, M., “Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds from the Use of Chlorine-Bleach- Containing Household Products”, Environmental Science & Technology 42, 1445-1451, (2008). Available at: http://pubs.acs.org/journals/esthag/
    6. ^ Odabasi, M., “Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds from the Use of Chlorine-Bleach- Containing Household Products, Slide presentation (2008). Available at: http://www.slideworld.org/ViewSlides.aspx?URL=5092




    Has anyone heard any of this before?
    A+ Pressure Washing, LLC
    Zack Young
    Luling, Louisiana
    (985)703-0767

  2. #2

    Re: OSHA standards for sodium hypochloite

    I'll take those risks any day over experiencing the black plague again - bleach is humanity's friend. Case in point - a town nearby is experiencing severe e. coli contamination in their water supply - guess what they used to clean it up?
    Daniel Tambasco
    (978)749-9808
    'Oh, they're not scared of you. They're scared of what you represent to 'em.' -George Hanson, Easy Rider

  3. #3

    Re: OSHA standards for sodium hypochloite

    I don't think it's the bleach, it's mixxing with other household cleaners containging sodium bisulfate (sodium hydrogen sulfate). I picked up a bottle of dawn to see if it had any, but all it said was 'DO NOT MIX WITH BLEACH'. From what I can understand it is an active ingredent in drain cleaners. I wonder if some research should be done about ajax and to find a soap that is ok to mix with bleach.
    A+ Pressure Washing, LLC
    Zack Young
    Luling, Louisiana
    (985)703-0767

  4. #4

    Re: OSHA standards for sodium hypochloite

    But at the same time ethanol is the reason for dawn soap and i just found this.

    "Sodium bisulfate behaves, to some degree, as if it were a complex of sodium sulfate with sulfuric acid. This is evident if either the anhydrous form or the monohydrate come in contact with ethanol, which causes them to separate into those two components.[1]"

    A+ Pressure Washing, LLC
    Zack Young
    Luling, Louisiana
    (985)703-0767

  5. #5
    Prestige Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Ridgeland, MS
    Posts
    4,400

    Re: OSHA standards for sodium hypochloite

    Do a search here for "Apple Cider"
    Jackson MS

    Extreme Video Training
    www.extremevideotraining.com
    [url=http://www.extremevideotraining.com]Video Services in Jackson MS[/url

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •